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Auteur Fil de discussion: CRTC: Consultation on Obligation to Serve - DUE DATE AUG 10  (Lu 312 fois)
Jay Frank
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« le: 1 août 2010, 02:03:07 »
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Fellow Pirates:

As Per Geist:

http://www.michaelgeist.ca/content/view/5225/196/

""
CRTC Launches Consultation on Basic Service
Monday July 26, 2022
The CRTC has launched a new public consultation on basic access, including a YouTube video designed to generate broader participation.  The consultation, which is part of a broader proceeding, includes five questions on telephone, wireless, and Internet services.  The deadline for submission is August 10, 2010.""

The CRTC video is on youtube:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nynBCH1kVbA&feature=player_embedded

The main Gov link is here:

http://o2s.publivate.ca/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=52&Itemid=68&lang=en

Do your part - raise your flag - educate your government.

Oh and of coarse share your views here with us.

Jay
« Dernière édition: 1 août 2010, 02:52:33 par Jay Frank »

The price good men pay for indifference to public affairs is to be ruled by evil men.
-Plato
Jay Frank
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« Répondre #1 le: 1 août 2010, 02:34:07 »
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These are the questions asked:

1. What services should be included as part of your basic telephone services today?

A:  Privacy, security, accessibility, interoperability at affordable and competitive Canadian pricing.

2. In the context of this objective, what role, if any, should the CRTC play in ensuring that all Canadians have access to broadband Internet service at comparable rates?

A: Enforce Net-Neutrality with common sense and a direction of promoting innovative expansion through Canadian competition.  The CRTC should play no role in price fixing and should protect existing Canadian telecom business' from hostile takeovers from foreign investors looking to capitalize on Canadian owned infrastructure.  The CRTC should make it illegal for Telecoms to outsource jobs to foreign countries where access to sensitive account information such as drivers license, health card, social insurance numbers ect are regularly used to authenticate Canadian citizens over the telephone.  Customer Care, Sales, Billing and Technical Support workers in foreign lands should not have access to Canadian citizens private information.  It's just common sense.  What is the CRTC doing about protecting Canadian jobs and information?

3. Do you think that cellphone service can be a substitute for traditional home phone landline service? Explain why or why not.

A: In remote areas wireless is an obvious choice when compared to running rj-11, coax or ultimately fiber optics to every citizens door.  Technology already exists to roll out high-throughput wireless and it's far cheaper to run fiber to single towers covering large areas than to last mile individual rural homes.

4. Do you think that wireless services (e.g. Wi-Fi, 3G networks or satellite) can be substitutes for landline services to connect to the Internet? Explain why or why not.

A: If you can connect to the internet you already have access to a plethora of VoIP phone services.  Provided your ISP has robust bandwidth and treats VoIP traffic in a Neutral fashion, the quality of VoIP is comparable to the Plain Old Telephone System. (POTS).  Having an Internet Phone is not locked down by location like POTS is and long distance charges are quickly becoming a thing of the past for the typical educated netizen.

5. For what activities do you use or expect to use your Internet service?

A:  I live on a dead end road and have 100mb internet service.  Since installing it, I have canceled my television and land line telephone as there is no longer a need for them.  If I did not still have a need for parcels and packages delivered to my door, I could also cancel postal delivery because I pay all my bills and shop for everything besides food online.
----------------

Do your part - raise your flag - educate your government.

Oh and of coarse share your views here with us.

Jay

The price good men pay for indifference to public affairs is to be ruled by evil men.
-Plato
Mike Bleskie
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« Répondre #2 le: 2 août 2010, 11:52:48 »
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Citation
4. Do you think that wireless services (e.g. Wi-Fi, 3G networks or satellite) can be substitutes for landline services to connect to the Internet? Explain why or why not.

A: If you can connect to the internet you already have access to a plethora of VoIP phone services.  Provided your ISP has robust bandwidth and treats VoIP traffic in a Neutral fashion, the quality of VoIP is comparable to the Plain Old Telephone System. (POTS).  Having an Internet Phone is not locked down by location like POTS is and long distance charges are quickly becoming a thing of the past for the typical educated netizen.

But at this point in time, there is not enough new infrastructure, sometimes even older infrastructure in areas that are considered remote, or even rural areas in some provinces (ex: good luck getting 3G service in Algonquin Park or anywhere east of that until you reach Pembroke.) At this time, it's not feasible to say these technologies are a feasible replacement at this point in time, when there is still a clear majority of people using landlines. We clearly need to move in that direction, but the pace needs to be slow, so that people don't fall behind. Start by upgrading rural and remote landline service to fibre. Be fair and non-discriminatory because of geographical location.

EDIT: I am expecting a call from a CRTC information officer this afternoon or tomorrow to find out the information for the public session in October and to submit my own independent opinions.
« Dernière édition: 2 août 2010, 12:07:44 par Mike Bleskie »

Mike Bleskie
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« Répondre #3 le: 2 août 2010, 06:13:48 »
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I found out the public session will be on the 25th of October in Gatineau.

Jake Daynes
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« Répondre #4 le: 5 août 2010, 12:40:48 »
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As per the post I made in my Leadership/Director application, here are my answers to the consultation:


1st question:

I believe that as technology adapts, our needs adapt along with it, as well as our expectations. At the same time, I am completely against the sense of entitlement many consumers have in regards to private services. I feel that a balance needs to be struck between our expectations and needs in regards to such services, considering that many providers are private companies now. I believe that aside from a basic foundation, regulators should be completely removed from decisions made by private corporations. e911 services as well as nationwide services should be available to all, considering the vast increases in technology since the last time this kind of framework was restructured. I am a firm believer that borders are slowly losing their purpose, considering the advent of the internet in its current form, people are increasingly innovating and finding ways to make a living using this incredible resource. I believe that high speed internet connections for all Canadians is the next step to helping keep Canada up to date with other international entities. Countries such as Spain and Finland have already made broadband access a universal right. As far as access to a local directory, I feel that with the internet in the state it is today, it would be more environmentally sound ideology to remove the necessity, though allow them to be ordered for no charge, of such directories.

2nd question:

I am a firm believer in the Free Market ideology. As such, I believe that private corporations should be free to make their own decisions in regards to how they run their business as long as this does not go against any Canadian laws. However, I understand that many Canadians rely on broadband service to make their way in life. I therefore feel that a basic framework needs to be laid down in regards to making sure that if a corporation services multiple areas, all of their clients, regardless of area, are given the same service. I also believe that in the name of competitive markets, regulations restricting foreign corporations from entering the Canadian market should be adjusted to make it more likely for said corporations to move their business to Canada. I do not believe that any regulator board should be able to impact the operations of a business unless they present a threat to consumers, employees of the corporation or to Canadian interests.

3rd question:

The three topics in the title of this post outline the only things holding mobile devices from taking over the communication market in Canada. We currently pay some of the highest mobility rates, and are given a minimum amount of features that the rest of the world takes for granted. Our cellular technologies are so behind the times its laughable, up until last year the majority of Canadians were still on the outdated dinosaur CDMA and we have yet to get a 4G network in Canada. This results in horrible service in various parts of the country, and even dead zones in certain areas of towns and cities. We also do not have near enough nationwide providers to choose from, and this is because of Bell and Telus looking at a merger, along with their child companies, koodo and Solo mobile giving the illusion of choice to consumers. Wind Mobile and Mobilicity entering the market is a start, but neither carrier is close enough to becoming nationwide to be a viable choice. As such, cell phones are not ready to take over the telecommunication market in Canada and should not be considered a viable replacement.

4th question:

I believe that at this stage of Canada's technological history wireless data such as 3G and public wifi can only be considered supplementary. In no way is our infrastructure large enough, nor is it capable of supporting the large amount of traffic that making it our internet backbone would require. Once the wireless infrastructure is expanded and upgraded to handle as much bandwidth requirements as our current land based services can, then it will be suitable for such things, though cost will also need to come down. Canadian's currently pay 3rd most out of 30 modern countries in a study by an independent company. (OECD)

5th question:

As a private member of the Pirate Party of Canada and the current interim Leader of the Party, I am actively involved in social politics and the formation of a political party whose platform is based almost solely on its constituents. The internet has made this possible. It has brought together thousands of Canadians all looking for a change from the big four, and allows Canadians to make their voice heard. I also use it as part of my private occupation, as a technical support representative for a leading real estate software company. In my spare time I am actively involved in online activities, from international communication with family and friends overseas to helping small businesses with web security concerns. The internet is an indispensable part of modern living.


I hope that this gives you sufficient incite into my views regarding such matters.

Jake Daynes

From Port to port, From Sea to Sea
Your rights matter, You matter.
Vote Pirate
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